Good Rules for Safety

As I was walking through the facilities at Fort Houston, I came across a sign posted on the doorway to the wood shop. My photo didn’t come out very clear, but here’s what it said:

NOTICE

As per the the Metro Fire Marshall, this space must maintain a level of cleanliness to ensure the safety and well being of those occupying this facility. Given the severity of the situation, the following wood shop policies will be enacted and enforced:

  • All work areas must be maintained and free of dust upon completion of task
  • For your convenience a shop vacuum and brooms will be provided
  • Tools must be cleaned after use
  • No wood shall remain in the wood shop
  • Any wood left in the wood shop for more than 24 hours will be disposed of without question
  • If found abusing equipment or not maintaining the shop upon completion of tasks, one is subject to suspension of shop privileges

Now if I can just make myself follow these rules in my own shop. Right now I’m looking at a suspension of shop priveleges.

Ready Safety Posters or You Might Be Missing Something

My Name is Randy and I’m a Messaholic

Hi. My name is Randy and I’m a messaholic. I wish for a support group for guys like me. I’m a professional yet I’m ashamed to let anyone see my shop. I see all of these shops in magazines where everything is spotless and neat.

I can spend two days cleaning and organizing my shop. But within two hours of starting a new project, I can’t find one square foot of space on my benchtop. Why is that? Does anyone else share this problem? If so, have you been able to overcome it? How?

My shop takes up a little more than two thirds of a two-car garage. In that shop I have a table saw, 12″ planer, router table, scroll saw, 14″ band saw, 36″ x 80″ bench (made from an old solid-core door), a 30″ x 72″ woodworking bench with drawers underneath, a 24″ x 48″ cabinet that houses my benchtop radial-arm drill press and mortiser, plus a spindle sander. That’s not to mention all the bits and pieces of this and that strewn about and tucked into every nook and cranny. So even when everything is in it’s place (wherever that may be), it’s still hard to navigate around my shop.

I did make a major step toward a cure for my condition a few years ago. I took a few days to really try hard to find a permanent home for all of the stuff that typically clutters my bench — hand tools, rules, marking tools, power drills and drivers, wood scraps, sanding supplies, and just about anything else you could imagine. It helps tremendously to know where a tool belongs. This way, when you need it, you know exactly where to find it.

That is if you put it back where it belongs the last time you used it. And this is where a lot of my “condition” exhibits itself. When I’m in the middle of a project, I typically don’t take the time to put everything back where it belongs. I figure I’ll need it again soon anyway, so why bother. The problem is, I end up spending time later looking for it amongst the clutter on my benchtop…or drill press table…or router table. That ends up taking longer than if I had taken the time to put it away in the first place.

I’m trying hard to teach myself to take 15 minutes or so at the end of my time in the shop every day to put things back in their proper place. It’s against my nature. Usually I’m tired or frustrated and just want to call it quits for the day.

I know…I should just suck it up and “do the right thing.” I’ll try. Really, I will.

In the meantime, I have to work up the nerve to throw away the 7,259 board feet of scraps I can’t just seem to part with.

So tell me…what’s your secret to keeping your shop clutter-free? Or do you suffer from the same condition?

I’m dying to know. Leave me a comment.